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A 1997 John Beckwith composition called Blurred Lines has gone unexpectedly viral thanks to a current Billboard-topping pop tune by Robin Thicke that has the same name.

Staff at the Canadian record label Centrediscs, which specializes in contemporary music, noticed that thousands of international music fans have been flocking to their site recently to hear the composition for harpsichord and violin.

Those music fans were likely looking to stream Thicke's R&B chart-topping hit of the same name, and were surely surprised to be treated to some contemporary Canadian music.

Beckwith’s Blurred Lines explores non-traditional textures and techniques on both harpsichord and violin. The intentionally detuned violin intervals send shivers down one's spine, in a very different way from Thicke’s smooth vocals. Apart from the title, the 10-minute composition shares nothing in common with Thicke’s controversial pop hit.

LISTEN

Listen to John Beckwith’s Blurred Lines performed by Lawrence Beckwith (violin) and Vivienne Spiteri (harpsichord).


A recording of Beckwith’s Blurred Lines is also available on CD from Centrediscs. You can hear more from Beckwith on his CBC Music artist page.

This isn’t the first time Beckwith has shared a commonality with pop culture. Owen Wilson’s character in the 2005 movie Wedding Crashers goes by the name John Beckwith.

We’re sure the similarity was unintentional, but Canadian contemporary music won some unexpected exposure here. And that’s not such a bad thing.

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Canadian composition Blurred Lines goes accidentally viral thanks to Robin Thicke

A 1997 John Beckwith composition called Blurred Lines has gone unexpectedly viral thanks to a current…

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onlytony
#1 posted by
onlytony
on Aug 21, 2013

blurred lines

a clear preference

Paul_Rapoport
#2 posted by
Paul_Rapoport
on Aug 21, 2013

While we're correcting misimpressions, "shares the same name" is redundant. How could they share different names? It's either "shares the name" or "has the same name." (Then it comes around in the imaginative variation "shares a commonality." How could they not share a commonality?)But big hurrahs for John Beckwith. Maybe my next composition should be titled Artpop.

Michael Morreale
#3 posted by
Michael Morreale
on Aug 21, 2013

Hi Paul. Good eye, you're right! The fix has been made.

chitchens
#4 posted by
chitchens
on Aug 21, 2013

This is great! John Beckwith called his memoir Unheard Of. I guess that's not the case anymore. 

Derek Lindner
#5 posted by
Derek Lindner
on Aug 21, 2013

I love all harpsichords in the moderne environment.

Time to pull Ovation Vol. 3 http://musiccentre.ca/node/40551 for a little more of John's music.

Thanks to the CMC for this series.

norain
#6 posted by
norain
on Aug 22, 2013

oh ya thats exsactly it !   heh heh  opps lost my que and couldnt make the words fit .lolo

"you da sexxiest bitch in da place "

onlytony
#7 posted by
onlytony
on Aug 22, 2013

easily done in our field   norain

Derek Lindner
#8 posted by
Derek Lindner
on Aug 22, 2013

If only John would've named 'Circle, with Tangents' to 'When the Circle Married the Line.'

Nice to hear Victor Feldbrill and the Hamilton Phil on that Ovation Vol. 3

Those were my years in Steeltown.

Robert Rowat
#9 posted by
Robert Rowat
on Aug 23, 2013

The BBC read this blog post and made an item out of it: http://www.theworld.org/2013/08/canadian-classical-composer-gets-boost-from-blurred-lines/

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